authoritative DNS

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Enabling DNSSEC

Scenario:

You need to enable the “Domain Name System Security Extensions” for one authoritative DNS zone you previously configured (please see the “Create an authoritative DNS zone” howto).

 

How to configure DNSSEC:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials

DNSSEC - Logon screen

From the main interface dashboard, click on the authoritative zone you want to enable DNSSEC for

 

DNSSEC - Zone selection

The zone configuration dashboard is then displayed. By default DNSSEC is disabled: click on the “Enabled” switch button to turn it on:

DNSSEC - Enabling for a zone

After turning on the “Enabled” flag, a warning is displayed to remind you that you will have to send the DS record to your registrar, in order to establish the chain of trust.

DNSSEC - Confirmation

After acknowledging the reminder, click on the “Save” button at the bottom of the page in order to save changes:

DNSSEC - Zone records

After saving changes, click on the “Show DS Record” button, to display the DS record that will have to be shared with your domain registrar:

DNSSEC - Getting DS Record

The DS record for your domain is displayed. This will have to be shared with your domain registrar in order to complete DNSSEC configuration. Based on your preferred digest type you will be able to select one of the displayed DS records:

DNSSEC - Displaying DS Record

DNSSEC is now enabled, and will be used for all static and dynamic records, and for all geohosts belonging to the authoritative zone.

Importing authoritative zones

Scenario:

You want to replace your current authoritative DNS infrastructure (either owned or hosted by a third party) with GSLB.me, and you want to leverage automatic import of your already existing zones. Import must not require manual configuration and must be based on standard DNS zone transfer from your existing authoritative DNS.

How to configure it:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account

Screenshot-1

 

The authoritative zones import dashboard can be accessed either by right-clicking on “Customer zones” on the left panel or on the “DNS zones import” icon in the main screen section.

 

import.howto.2

 

After selecting the DNS zones import tool, the import dashboard is displayed

 

import.howto.3

 

Here you can configure the IP address or FQDN of your current primary authoritative DNS server hosting the zone(s) you want to import to GSLB.me. The default TCP port to be used for zone transfers is 53, and is customizable should you use a different one.

GSLB.me can perform zone transfers using a TSIG key (Transaction SIGnature key) or by configuring your current primary authoritative DNS server to allow zone transfers over TCP as requested by GSLB.me‘s zone importer’s IP address, which is shown on the DNS zone importer screen.

Several zones can be imported at the same time: all zone names must be entered in the “Zones to import” section, typing one zone name per line. When done, you can click “Import zones” to run the import procedure.

 

import.howto.4

 

When done, a summary is displayed detailing the zone import outcome on a per-zone basis.

 

import.howto.5

After importing one or more authoritative zones to GSLB.me you will need to contact your registrar to change their authoritative DNS to ns1.gslb.me and ns2.gslb.me: this will enable GSLB.me to fully host and handle your domain(s) resolution.

When done you will be able to add smart DNS resolution to your zone(s) by configuring geohosts to implement load balancing, proximity routing, geo-routing, add security by setting up DNS firewall rules, tracking and analyzing your DNS traffic creating customized analytics reports and more. Our technical support team is available to assist you configuring your DNS services, for free.

Using Reporting and Data Intelligence

Scenario:

You need to keep track and analyze DNS requests and responses for one of your running geohosts by configuring and customizing graphical reports.

How to configure it:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account:

graph-howto-1

To create a new graph from the main screen you can either right-click on the geohost name and select “Reporting engine“:

graph-howto-2

Or you can select the “Geohost reporting engine” from the main panel:

 

graph-howto-3

After clicking the “Geohost reporting engine” icon you can select the geohost you want to define graphs for using the dropdown menu:

 

graph-howto-4

Accessing the “Geohost reporting engine” brings you to the main graphs configuration section, which is initially empty. Clicking on the “Add new graph” button allows you to configure and customize your graph(s):

graph-howto-5

In order to create a new graph, its descriptive name must be specified. This is a purely mnemonic name and can’t be changed:

graph-howto-6

After typing the name, a default graph is set up, to display geohost DNS requests and responses (split by target) over the last 24 hours. Several other parameters such as font size, resolution, colors, etc are set to default values. After making changes, you can click on the “Save and update graph” button at the bottom of the page to commit and to display the updated graph.

graph-howto-7

The newly created graph can be fully modified and customized by setting its parameters in the “Graph style and appearance“, “Data series configuration” and “Timespan selection” sections. For instance you can try to change the parameter “Summarize minutes” from the default value of 1 to 10: this tells GSLB.me to display the graph averaging values over 10 minutes timeframes. By default data is averaged every 60 seconds. After setting “Summarize minutes” to 10 you need to click the “Save and update graph” at the bottom of the screen to commit changes.

graph-howto-8

As a further example. you might want to display only DNS requests sent to your geohost: the default graph also displays per-target DNS responses. In order to disable the latter, you can turn off the “Draw replies for all targets” switch. Once done, you can click on the “Save and update graph” button at the bottom of the screen:

graph-howto-9

The updated graph is then displayed.

You can define an unrestricted number of additional graphs, to keep track of DNS requests and responses, and to show different geohost-related scenarios.

To delete an existing graph you can click on the “X” close to the graph title, in the tab row at the top of the screen:

graph-howto-10

 

 

A confirmation window is displayed, and you can click “Yes” to delete the selected graph:

 

graph-howto-11

 

Create an authoritative DNS zone

Scenario:

You want to use GSLB.me as the authoritative DNS for your domain “mydomain.com“. mydomain.com can be a new domain you’re about to register, or it can be an already existing domain.

What you get:

  • flexible IPv4 and IPv6 support
  • support for A, AAAA, ALIAS, CERT, CNAME, LOC, MX, NS, RP, SOA, SPF, SRV, TXT records
  • dynamic DNS support for as many FQDNs as you need
  • configurable TTL for all records (subscribers only)
  • support for wildcard records
  • works with all Internet top level domains
  • easy migration from your legacy DNS provider
  • fast and advanced web user interface
  • seamless configuration, no need to manage master and slave DNS servers
  • globally distributed with no single point of failure so that your domains are always accessibile
  • actively developed and supported
  • two access models: totally free or subscription-based for additional features and flexibility

The first domain you configure on GSLB.me for authoritative DNS purposes is totally free.

How to configure it:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account

authoritative DNS - Logon screen

Create a new “customer zone”: this is the domain name you want to handle using GSLB.me as your authoritative DNS. You can create a customer zone for a domain name you already own (in this case you will ask your registrar to modify the authoritative DNS it relies on) or for a domain name you still have to register (in this case you will tell your registrar to use GSLB.me as your domain’s authoritative DNS servers). Creating a new zone can be done either by clicking on the button you can find on the main page immediately after logging on to GSLB.me…

authoritative DNS - Zone creation

…or by right clicking in the main panel on the “Customer zones” section.

authoritative DNS - Zone creation

The “Zone edit” page allows you to create your domain: here you have to specify the domain name and the e-mail address of the contact person. This e-mail address will be used as the postmaster in the SOA record for your zone.

authoritative DNS - SOA record definition

Once done, click on “Save” to create your zone. After saving, the left-hand side of the page will be updated showing your newly created zone:

authoritative DNS - created zone

The SOA and NS records for your zone have been automatically created. “2 rrsets” indicates that ns1.gslb.me and ns2.gslb.me have been defined as the “NS” records for your domain. You can check this using dig or similar tools:

authoritative DNS - dig testing

On the left-hand side of the screen click on the domain you just created: this brings you to the main domain configuration page.

authoritative DNS - Records editor

Here you can change the domain’s contact e-mail address and fully edit your domain records (also called rrsets). Records types A, AAAA, CNAME, LOC, MX, NS, RP, SOA, SPF, SRV, TXT are supported. In order to add a new record you simply have to type the record name, select the type from the dropdown menu and assign a value. TTL is set to 86400 seconds for free GSLB.me users. Subscribers can set it to anything in the 300-86400 seconds range.

In order to add a record for your zone you have to set the record name, select its type, define the value and set the TTL (free users can’t change TTL: it is set to 86400 seconds by default). When done, click “Add record” in order to save the new rrset.

authoritative DNS - adding record

After saving your record(s), it is displayed in the lower section of the page. In the example here the record name “www” is appended with the zone name: the actual record shown here is www.mydomain.com, and it points to IP address 1.2.3.4

authoritative DNS - saving record

It is required to click on “Save” when all records have been added to your zone. If you don’t do this, your records will be kept but they will not be active. Clicking the “Save” button applies changes and makes all records active and running.

You can now check to see if the newly configured record works fine:

authoritative DNS - resolution testing

After configuring all the records you need (free users are limited to 20 records, subscribers can use an unrestricted number of records per domain) you need to get back to your registrar and tell them that you want to use ns1.gslb.me and ns2.gslb.me as authoritative DNS for your domain (mydomain.com in this example).

Once this last step is completed you’re done! You domain is fully handled by GSLB.me and you can rely on all the features it provides.

When configuring a record you can use a FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) as the record value: for instance record “@”, type “MX” can have a value of “10 myothermailserver.myotherdomain.com.”. If the record value ends with “.” it is used as it is. If it doesn’t end with “.” your zone name is added at the end of the specified record value. For instance record “@”, type “MX” can have a value of “10 mail”. This means that the Mail eXchanger for mydomain.com is mail.mydomain.com where “.mydomain.com” is added after “mail”.

One more last thing: in addition to using GSLB.me as your authoritative DNS of choice you can seamlessly mix static DNS resolution together with GSLB dynamic resolution to handle disaster recovery, business continuity, CDN offload, geographical balancing for one or more records in your domain (such “smart” records are referred to as “geohosts”). To achieve this, simply right click on your domain name and create your geohosts!

authoritative DNS - adding geohost

In order to discover the full power of geohosts you can read our other howtos.

Create URL Forwarding Rules

Scenario:

You want to use GSLB.me to define URL Forwarding rules to translate a short, easy-to-remember URL to a longer web address that can point to a different port and/or rewriting an HTTP request into an HTTPS one. URL Forwarding is a feature that allows you to:

  • share a shorter, easier-to-remember HTTP address that automatically redirects clients to a different HTTP/HTTPS address by changing the server name, the URI and the server port
  • hide your complex website/application URLs behind an iframe-powered “masquerading” HTTP address
  • host your own webserver on your home/office Internet connection even if your ISP is blocking direct access to port 80, 443 or other ports. The shorter HTTP address is published by GSLB.me geographically redundant infrastructure and translates clients requests steering them to your home/office webserver

How to configure it:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account

Screenshot-1

 

Add a new “URL Forward” rule: this can be done either by clicking on the “URL Forward” icon on the main page that is displayed immediately after logging in:

 

howto.urlfwd.1

 

and then selecting the zone where you want to create the URL Forward rule:

 

howto.urlfwd.3

…or by right clicking in the main panel in the “Customer zones” section (if you are adding a URL Forward rule to one of your own domains) or in the “GSLB.me zones” section (if you just need a URL Forward rule without using GSLB.me as your authoritative DNS solution):

howto.urlfwd.2

The “URL Forward edit” page allows you to define your URL Forward rule. Parameters that can be defined include:

  • name: This is the name of your “short” HTTP address. This name will be trailed with the zone name so, if “name” is set to “myshorturl” and “zone name” is set to “gslb.mobi“, the full HTTP address you will type in your browser (and share on the Internet) will be http://myshorturl.gslb.mobi
  • destination URL: This is the HTTP (or HTTPS) address the “short” address will be forwarded/translated to. If “destination URL” is set to “http://my.very.long.url.com:8080/test/page.html?id=123“, all browsers and HTTP clients requesting “http://myshorturl.gslb.mobi” will be transparently forwarded to “http://my.very.long.url.com:8080/test/page.html?id=123
  • hidden destination URL: if this option is disabled, browsers and HTTP clients requesting the “short” URL will be redirected to the “destination URL“. If “hidden destination URL” is enabled, the “destination URL” will be displayed on clients browsers inside an hidden iframe. This behaviour “masquerades” the redirection from the end user’s perspective. This option is supported if the destination URL is an HTTP address, if it is an HTTPS address, hidden destination URL is silently ignored.
  • browser window title: if hidden destination URL is enabled, it is possible to set up the window title the browser will show when rendering the destination URL through the iframe. This option is supported if the destination URL is an HTTP address, if it is an HTTPS address, browser window title is silently ignored.

howto.urlfwd.4

Once done, click on “Save” to create your URL Forward rule. After saving, the left-hand side of the page will be updated showing your newly created rule, marked with a star icon, meaning that it has to be committed in order to make it active and fully operative:

howto.urlfwd.5

In order to fully enable the URL Forward rule, it is necessary to “commit” it. This can be done by either clicking on the “commit” button displayed at the top of the GSLB.me screen, or by right-clicking the rule name and selecting “commit changes“:

howto.urlfwd.6

After committing pending changes the URL Forward rule is fully operative. You can now run your favourite browser/HTTP client and browse to http://myshorturl.gslb.mobi

You will be redirected to the “Destination URL” configured here above.

Set up Dynamic DNS

Scenario:

You want to use GSLB.me as the authoritative DNS for your domain “mydomain.com“. mydomain.com can be a new domain you’re about to register, or it can be an already existing domain. Once done, you want to run “www.mydomain.com” from your webserver which sits on an Internet connection with a dynamic IP.

How to configure it:

Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account

Screenshot-1

Create a new “customer zone”: this is the domain name you want to handle using GSLB.me as your authoritative DNS. You can create a customer zone for a domain name you already own (in this case you will ask your registrar to modify the authoritative DNS it relies on) or for a domain name you still have to register (in this case you will tell your registrar to use GSLB.me as your domain’s authoritative DNS servers). Creating a new zone can be done either by clicking on the button you can find on the main page immediately after logging on to GSLB.me…

Screenshot-2

…or by right clicking in the main panel on the “Customer zones” section.

Screenshot-3

The “Zone edit” page allows you to create your domain: here you have to specify the domain name and the e-mail address of the contact person. This e-mail address will be used as the postmaster in the SOA record for your zone.

Screenshot-4

Once done, click on “Save” to create your zone. After saving, the left-hand side of the page will be updated showing your newly created zone:

Screenshot-5

The SOA and NS records for your zone have been automatically created. “2 rrsets” indicates that ns1.gslb.me and ns2.gslb.me have been defined as the “NS” records for your domain. You can check this using dig or similar tools:

Screenshot-6

On the left-hand side of the screen click on the domain you just created: this brings you to the main domain configuration page.

Screenshot-8

Here you can change the domain’s contact e-mail address and fully edit your domain records (also called rrsets). Records types A, AAAA, CNAME, LOC, MX, NS, RP, SOA, SPF, SRV, TXT are supported. In order to add a new record you simply have to type the record name, select the type from the dropdown menu and assign a value. TTL is set to 86400 seconds for free GSLB.me users. Subscribers can set it to anything in the 300-86400 seconds range.

In order to add a record for your zone you have to set the record name, select its type, define the value and set the TTL (free users can’t change TTL: it is set to 86400 seconds by default). When done, click “Add record” in order to save the new rrset.

Screenshot-9

After saving your record(s), it is displayed in the lower section of the page. In the example here the record name “www” is appended with the zone name: the actual record shown here is www.mydomain.com, and it points to IP address 1.2.3.4

Screenshot-10

It is required to click on “Save” when all records have been added to your zone. If you don’t do this, your records will be kept but they will not be active. Clicking the “Save” button applies changes and makes all records active and running.

You can now check to see if the newly configured record works fine:

Screenshot-11

After configuring all the records you need (free users are limited to 20 records, subscribers can use an unrestricted number of records per domain) you need to get back to your registrar and tell them that you want to use ns1.gslb.me and ns2.gslb.me as authoritative DNS for your domain (mydomain.com in this example).

When configuring a record you can use a FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) as the record value: for instance record “@”, type “MX” can have a value of “10 myothermailserver.myotherdomain.com.”. If the record value ends with “.” it is used as it is. If it doesn’t end with “.” your zone name is added at the end of the specified record value. For instance record “@”, type “MX” can have a value of “10 mail”. This means that the Mail eXchanger for mydomain.com is mail.mydomain.com where “.mydomain.com” is added after “mail”.

Once this last step is completed, your www.mydomain.com FQDN correctly responds to DNS queries.

 

How to update dynamic DNS records:

Dynamic DNS records can be updated in two ways:

  • Using GSLB.me REST APIs either directly or through GSLB.me update client
  • Using a standard update client such as ddclient: GSLB.me fully supports dyndns2 protocol

 

Updating dynamic DNS records via REST APIs:

You can install GSLB.me update client in order to tell GSLB.me to associate your dynamic IP address to your FQDN (www.mydomain.com in our example).

GSLB.me update client can be downloaded here (you need at least v1.1beta). It’s a Java client, hence it can be run virtually anywhere. It provides a number of parameters in order to correctly fetch your dynamic IP address. Once downloaded and unpacked you will find the startup script inside the “/sbin” directory. Some useful commandlines to run it are:

Updating a FQDN with the public (dynamic) IP of the specified interface without/with custom TTL:

	./sh.GSLB.ME-RestClient -u [username] -p [password] -dyn [fqdn] -iface [interface name]
	./sh.GSLB.ME-RestClient -u [username] -p [password] -dyn [fqdn] -iface [interface name] -ttl [seconds]

Updating a FQDN with the public (dynamic) IP using automatic IP detection without/with custom TTL:

	./sh.GSLB.ME-RestClient -u [username] -p [password] -dyn [fqdn]
	./sh.GSLB.ME-RestClient -u [username] -p [password] -dyn [fqdn] -ttl [seconds]

For correct operations running the update client should be done via crontab every 2 minutes or so, in order to keep your FQDN in sync with your dynamic IP.

Crontab job example:

*/2 * * * *    root     /home/mydir/GSLB.ME-RestClient/sbin/sh.GSLB.ME-RestClient -u username@domain.com -p myPassword -dyn www.mydomain.com -ttl 60 >/dev/null 2>/dev/null

Updating dynamic DNS records via dyndns2 protocol:

GSLB.me fully supports the dyndns2 protocol. It is then possible to use any DNS update client or device that can use the dyndns2 protocol to update your dynamic DNS records.

One of such update clients is ddclient (http://ddclient.sourceforge.net/) and a sample configuration you can use to make it work with GSLB.me is:

daemon=30                       # check every 30 seconds
syslog=yes                      # log update msgs to syslog
mail=YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS         # mail all msgs to your e-mail address
mail-failure=YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS # mail failed update msg to your e-mail address
pid=/var/run/ddclient.pid       # record PID in file.
use=if,if=ppp0                  # set dynamic IP address via interfaces

server=dynupdate.gslb.me        # GSLB.me update server
login=YOUR_GSLBME_USERNAME      # GSLB.me username
password=YOUR_GSLBME_PASSWORD   # GSLB.me password
protocol=dyndns2                # The dyndns2 protocol
YOUR_GSLBME_DYNAMIC_FQDN        # The dynamic DNS record to update (ie. www.mydomain.com)

 

Conclusion:

One more last thing: in addition to using GSLB.me as your authoritative DNS of choice you can seamlessly mix static DNS resolution together with GSLB dynamic resolution to handle disaster recovery, business continuity, CDN offload, geographical balancing for one or more records in your domain (such “smart” records are referred to as “geohosts”). To achieve this, simply right click on your domain name and create your geohosts!

Screenshot-12

In order to discover the full power of geohosts you can read our other howtos.

Dynamic CDN Offload

Scenario:

  • You have one or more datacenters running your application
  • Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com)
  • You are using a third-party CDN (Content Delivery Network) solution to offload your traffic to your content provider
  • You need your clients traffic to be sent to your datacenter(s) as long as it/they is/are available
  • If one or more datacenters are not available you want your traffic to be dynamically and automatically offloaded to your CDN provider

Solution:

  • Use GSLB.me with your load balancing algorithm of choice and enable CDN offload
  • Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record
  • Create your target
  • Assign the relevant checks to the target
  • Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS server that handles the domain myapplication.com

How to configure it:

  1. Register on GSLB.me and log on
  2. Select under which one of the available domains (gslb.us, gslb.info, …) you want to create your geohost. You can choose the domain you prefer, this is purely a “cosmetic” choice. Let’s choose mywebsite.gslb.eu
  3. Create your geohost: a geohost is the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) that your authoritative DNS will use as a CNAME for your application hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com). Select “Round robin” as your balancing algorithm. This can be any available algorithm, CDN offload overlays on top of all available balancing algorithms
  4. Define the target: the target’s IP address is a.b.c.d
  5. Select checks to be performed on the first target
  6. Configure your authoritative DNS to use a CNAME record to have www.myapplication.com point to mywebsite.gslb.eu
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  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide1
    Go to http://go.gslb.me and logon. If you still don't have an account you can register and then logon.
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    Slide2
    Once logged in let's create a sample geohost named mywebsite.gslb.eu. We can choose any top level domain among those shown on the left hand side of the GSLB.me interface.
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    Slide15
    Next, we need to configure the geohost name (it will be prepended to the zone we selected in the previous step), set it to enable and select your balancing algorithm. Let's also enable CDN Offload and specify our CDN hostname, the number of minimum available targets to trigger CDN offload and the percentage of DNS requests that shall be offloaded to the CDN. We can configure DNS replies TTL from here. When done, let's click on "Save" to save changes
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    Slide4
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
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    Slide5
    After creating the geohost we need to add targets: a target is the IP address of our application at each datacenter we are going to load balance. Let's right click on the geohost name and add the target from the popup menu that appears.
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    Slide6
    Let's now configure the IP address of our target, which is the IP address our application runs on the given datacenter. Then we also set priority to 1. This will set our geohost as primary. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done save the changes.
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    Slide7
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
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    Slide8
    Now we completed our geohost and target configuration. We need to commit this setup to make it active. To do so let's right click on the geohost name on the left hand side of the screen and commit the changes. You can also commit pending changes clicking on the "Commit changes" button at the top of the screen.
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    Slide9
    After committing changes a confirmation popup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
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    Slide10
    We can now open the map to display our targets' geographical position and availability. Right click on the geohost name and open the map.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide11
    The map shows our targets position and current availability. The map is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide12
    We can now open the status window to see the status of all geohosts and their targets. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the window.
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    Slide13
    The status window shows the health of our geohosts and targets. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide14
    Let's now right click on the geohost name again to show the DNS entry we need to add to our authoritative DNS for the "myapplication.com" domain in this example.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide15
    In our example we will need to add to the "myapplication.com" DNS zone the entry "www.myapplication.com. 600 IN CNAME mywebsite.gslb.eu". This enables GSLB.me-based load balancing for your www.myapplication.com fully qualified domain name.
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Geographical Proximity

Scenario:

  • You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity)
  • Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com)
  • On the first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t
  • You need your clients traffic to be sent to the geographically closest datacenter

Solution:

  • Use GSLB.me in geographical balancing mode
  • Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record
  • Create two targets, one for each datacenter
  • Assign the relevant checks to each target
  • Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS server that handles the domain myapplication.com

How to configure it:

  1. Register on GSLB.me and log on
  2. Select under which one of the available domains (gslb.us, gslb.info, …) you want to create your geohost. You can choose the domain you prefer, this is purely a “cosmetic” choice. Let’s choose mywebsite.gslb.eu
  3. Create your geohost: a geohost is the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) that your authoritative DNS will use as a CNAME for your application hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com). Select “Proximity” as your balancing algorithm. This will enable distribution of incoming traffic towards the datacenter which is closest to the client
  4. Define the first target: the target’s IP address is a.b.c.d
  5. Select checks to be performed on the first target
  6. Define the second target: the target’s IP address is x.y.z.t
  7. Select checks to be performed on the second target
  8. Configure your authoritative DNS to use a CNAME record to have www.myapplication.com point to mywebsite.gslb.eu
800true numbers under 600false false 800http://www.gslb.me/wp-content/plugins/thethe-image-slider/style/skins/frame-white
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide1
    Go to http://go.gslb.me and logon. If you still don't have an account you can register and then logon.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide2
    Once logged in let's create a sample geohost named mywebsite.gslb.eu. We can choose any top level domain among those shown on the left hand side of the GSLB.me interface.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide3
    Let's right click on the domain we choose in order to create a new geohost.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide4
    Next, we need to configure the geohost name (it will be prepended to the zone name we selected in the previous step), set it to enable and select "Geographical" as the balancing algorithm. We can configure DNS replies TTL from here. When done, let's click on "Save" to save changes
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide5
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide6
    After creating the geohost we need to add targets: a target is the IP address of our application at each datacenter we are going to load balance. Let's right click on the geohost name and add the target from the popup menu that appears.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide7
    Let's now configure the IP address of our target, which is the IP address our application runs on on the given datacenter. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide8
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide9
    Now we need to add our second target. a target is the IP address of our application at each datacenter we are going to load balance. Let's right click on the geohost name and add the target from the popup menu that appears.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide10
    Let's now configure the IP address of our second target, which is the IP address our application runs on the given datacenter. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done let's save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide11
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide12
    Now we completed our geohost and targets configuration. We need to commit this setup to make it active. To do so let's right click on the geohost name on the left hand side of the screen and commit the changes. You can also commit pending changes clicking on the "Commit changes" button at the top of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide13
    After committing changes a confirmation popup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide14
    We can now open the map to display our targets' geographical position and availability. Right click on the geohost name and open the map.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide15
    The map shows our targets positions and current availability. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide16
    We can now open the status window to see the status of all geohosts and their targets. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the window.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide17
    The status window shows the health of our geohosts and targets. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide18
    Right click on the geohost name again to show the DNS entry we need to add to our authoritative DNS for the "myapplication.com" domain in this example.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide19
    In our example we will need to add to the "myapplication.com" DNS zone the entry "www.myapplication.com. 600 IN CNAME mywebsite.gslb.eu". This enables GSLB.me-based load balancing for your www.myapplication.com fully qualified domain name.
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Active-Standby between 2 Datacenters

Scenario:

  • You have at least two datacenters running the same application. The primary datacenter is always active. In case of failure/disaster the secondary/backup datacenter must kick in taking control and providing access to your application (disaster recovery)
  • Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com)
  • On the primary datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the secondary/backup datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t
  • You need your clients traffic to be sent to the primary datacenter and, only in case of unavailability, be transparently sent to the secondary/backup datacenter

Solution:

  • Use GSLB.me in priority balancing mode
  • Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record
  • Create two targets, one for each datacenter
  • Assign the relevant checks to each target
  • Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS server that handles the domain myapplication.com

How to configure it:

  1. Register on GSLB.me and log on
  2. Select under which one of the available domains (gslb.us, gslb.info, …) you want to create your geohost. You can choose the domain you prefer, this is purely a “cosmetic” choice. Let’s choose myapplication.gslb.info
  3. Create your geohost: a geohost is the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) that your authoritative DNS will use as a CNAME for your application hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com). Select “Priority” as your balancing algorithm. This will enable active-standby distribution of incoming traffic towards your datacenters.
  4. Define the first target: the target’s IP address is a.b.c.d and its priority must be 1
  5. Select checks to be performed on the first target
  6. Define the second target: the target’s IP address is x.y.z.t and its priority must be any number higher than 1. This allows the “priority” balancing algorithm to handle active-standby.
  7. Select checks to be performed on the second target
  8. Configure your authoritative DNS to use a CNAME record to have www.myapplication.com point to myapplication.gslb.info
800true numbers under 600false false 800http://www.gslb.me/wp-content/plugins/thethe-image-slider/style/skins/frame-white
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide1
    Go to http://go.gslb.me and logon. If you still don't have an account you can register and then logon.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide2
    Let's right click on the domain we choose in order to create a new geohost. Let's then click on the menu that is opened and let's add the new geohost.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide3
    Next, we need to configure the geohost name (it will be prepended to the zone we selected in the previous step), set it to enable and select "Priority" as the balancing algorithm. We can configure DNS replies TTL from here. When done, let's click on "Save" to save changes
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide4
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide5
    After creating the geohost we need to add targets: a target is the IP address of our application at each datacenter we are going to load balance. Let's right click on the geohost name and add the target from the popup menu that appears.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide7
    Let's now configure the IP address of our target, which is the IP address our application runs on on the given datacenter. Let's also set priority to 1. This will set our geohost as primary. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done let's save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide9
    Let's now configure the IP address of our second target, which is the IP address our application runs on on the given datacenter. Let's also set priority to 2. This will set our geohost as secondary. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done let's save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide10
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide11
    Now we completed our geohost and targets configuration. We need to commit this setup to make it active. To do so let's right click on the geohost name on the left hand side of the screen and commit the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide12
    After committing changes a confirmation popup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide13
    We can now open the map to show our targets' geographical position and availability. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the map.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide14
    The map shows our targets positions and current availability. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide15
    We can now open the status window to see the status of all geohosts and their targets. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the window.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide16
    The status window shows the health of our geohosts and targets. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide18
    Let's now right click on the geohost name again to show the DNS entry we need to add to our authoritative DNS for the "myapplication.com" domain in this example.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide17
    In our example we will need to add to the "myapplication.com" DNS zone the entry "www.myapplication.com. 600 IN CNAME mywebsite.gslb.eu". This enables GSLB.me-based load balancing for your www.myapplication.com fully qualified domain name.
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Load balancing between two datacenters

Scenario:

  • You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity)
  • Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com)
  • On the  first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t
  • You need your clients traffic to be equally split between the two datacenters

Solution:

  • Use GSLB.me in round robin balancing mode
  • Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record
  • Create two targets, one for each datacenter
  • Assign the relevant checks to each target
  • Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS server that handles the domain myapplication.com

How to configure it:

  1. Register on GSLB.me and log on
  2. Select under which one of the available domains (gslb.us, gslb.info, …) you want to create your geohost. You can choose the domain you prefer, this is purely a “cosmetic” choice. Let’s choose mywebsite.gslb.eu
  3. Create your geohost: a geohost is the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) that your authoritative DNS will use as a CNAME for your application hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com). Select “Round robin” as your balancing algorithm. This will enable active-active distribution of incoming traffic towards your datacenters
  4. Define the first target: the target’s IP address is a.b.c.d
  5. Select checks to be performed on the first target
  6. Define the second target: the target’s IP address is x.y.z.t
  7. Select checks to be performed on the second target
  8. Configure your authoritative DNS to use a CNAME record to have www.myapplication.com point to mywebsite.gslb.eu
800true numbers under 600false false 800http://www.gslb.me/wp-content/plugins/thethe-image-slider/style/skins/frame-white
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide1
    Go to http://go.gslb.me and logon. If you still don't have an account you can register and then logon.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide2
    Once logged in let's create a sample geohost named mywebsite.gslb.eu. We can choose any top level domain among those shown on the left hand side of the GSLB.me interface.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide3
    Let's right click on the domain we choose in order to create a new geohost.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide4
    Next, we need to configure the geohost name (it will be prepended to the zone we selected in the previous step), set it to enable and select "Round Robin" as the balancing algorithm. We can configure DNS replies TTL from here. When done, let's click on "Save" to save changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide5
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide6
    After creating the geohost we need to add targets: a target is the IP address of our application at each datacenter we are going to load balance. Let's right click on the geohost name and add the target from the popup menu that appears.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide7
    Let's now configure the IP address of our target, which is the IP address our application runs on the given datacenter. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done let's save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide8
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide9
    Let's now configure the IP address of our second target, which is the IP address our application runs on on the given datacenter. Checks schedule time can be set and the list of healthchecks to be performed is also configured here. Once done, let's save the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide10
    After clicking on "Save" changes are committed and confirmation is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide11
    Now we completed our geohost and targets configuration. We need to commit this setup to make it active. To do so let's right click on the geohost name on the left hand side of the screen and commit the changes.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide12
    After committing changes a confirmation popup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide15
    We can now open the map to show our targets' geographical position and availability. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the map.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide16
    The map shows our targets positions and current availability. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide17
    We can now open the status window to see the status of all geohosts and their targets. Let's right click on the geohost name and open the window.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide18
    The status window shows the health of our geohosts and targets. It is automatically refreshed every 5 seconds.
  • 5000 slideright true 60 bottom 30
    Slide13
    Let's now right click on the geohost name again to display the DNS entry we need to add to our authoritative DNS for the "myapplication.com" domain in this example.
  • 5000 slideright true 80 bottom 30
    Slide14
    In our example we will need to add to the "myapplication.com" DNS zone the entry "www.myapplication.com. 600 IN CNAME mywebsite.gslb.eu". This enables GSLB.me-based load balancing for your www.myapplication.com fully qualified domain name.
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^