Configuring and using georouting

Scenario: You have several servers around the world publishing a website or an application that is accessed by users coming from different countries and geographies. You want to be able to decide which server(s) users will reach based on their country/countries of origin, and you want to handle “fallback” scenarios in case one or more servers are not available. GSLB.me georouting allows the creation of an unrestricted number of “routing rules” to achieve flexible, granular and precise DNS balancing and traffic distribution. Georouting rules can be based on: country of origin of the requesting DNS client region of origin of the requesting DNS client ASN (Autonomous System Number) of origin… Read More

Continue Reading

Enabling DNSSEC

Scenario: You need to enable the “Domain Name System Security Extensions”¬†for one authoritative DNS zone you previously configured (please see the “Create an authoritative DNS zone” howto).     How to configure DNSSEC: Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials From the main interface dashboard, click on the authoritative zone you want to enable DNSSEC for   The zone configuration dashboard is then displayed. By default DNSSEC is disabled: click on the “Enabled” switch button to turn it on: After turning on the “Enabled” flag, a warning is displayed to remind you that you will have to send the DS record to your registrar, in order to establish the chain… Read More

Continue Reading

Configuring and using passive checks

Scenario: You need to set up your smart DNS configuration so that the DNS resolution algorithm is driven by externally-fed performance/availability indicators, also known as metrics. In the following configuration example we will assume: the FQDN that will be resolved by clients worldwide is mytest.gslb.eu. This is your website/application host name. you have two servers (targets) that run contents for mytest.gslb.eu: 1 server with IP address 8.8.8.8 1 server with IP address 8.8.4.4 each server is considered available if its CPU load average is < 60% (this is handled by a passive check through metrics pushed to GSLB.me)     How to configure it: Log on to GSLB.me using your… Read More

Continue Reading

Create an authoritative DNS zone

Scenario: You want to use GSLB.me as the authoritative DNS for your domain “mydomain.com“. mydomain.com can be a new domain you’re about to register, or it can be an already existing domain.     What you get: flexible IPv4 and IPv6 support support for A, AAAA, ALIAS, CAA, CERT, CNAME, LOC, MX, NS, RP, SOA, SPF, SRV, SSHFP, TXT records dynamic DNS support for as many FQDNs as you need configurable TTL for all records (subscribers only) support for wildcard records works with all Internet top level domains easy migration from your legacy DNS provider fast and advanced web user interface seamless configuration, no need to manage master and slave… Read More

Continue Reading

Geographical Proximity

Scenario: You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity) Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com) On the first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t You need your clients traffic to be sent to the geographically closest datacenter through geographical proximity     Solution: Use GSLB.me in geographical balancing mode Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record Create two targets, one for each datacenter Assign the relevant checks to each target Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS… Read More

Continue Reading