Configuring and using passive checks

Scenario: You need to set up your smart DNS configuration so that the DNS resolution algorithm is driven by externally-fed performance/availability indicators, also known as metrics. In the following configuration example we will assume: the FQDN that will be resolved by clients worldwide is mytest.gslb.eu. This is your website/application host name. you have two servers (targets) that run contents for mytest.gslb.eu: 1 server with IP address 8.8.8.8 1 server with IP address 8.8.4.4 each server is considered available if its CPU load average is < 60% (this is handled by a passive check through metrics pushed to GSLB.me)     How to configure it: Log on to GSLB.me using your… Read More

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Using Reporting and Data Intelligence

Scenario: You need to keep track and analyze DNS requests and responses for one of your running geohosts by configuring and customizing graphical reports.     How to configure it: Log on to GSLB.me using your credentials or register if you still don’t have an account: To create a new graph from the main screen you can either right-click on the geohost name and select “Reporting engine“: Or you can select the “Geohost reporting engine” from the main panel:   After clicking the “Geohost reporting engine” icon you can select the geohost you want to define graphs for using the dropdown menu:   Accessing the “Geohost reporting engine” brings you… Read More

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Geographical Proximity

Scenario: You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity) Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com) On the first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t You need your clients traffic to be sent to the geographically closest datacenter through geographical proximity     Solution: Use GSLB.me in geographical balancing mode Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record Create two targets, one for each datacenter Assign the relevant checks to each target Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS… Read More

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Active-Standby between two datacenters

Scenario: You have at least two datacenters running the same application. The primary datacenter is always active. In case of failure/disaster the secondary/backup datacenter must kick in taking control and providing access to your application (disaster recovery) Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com) On the primary datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the secondary/backup datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t You need your clients traffic to be sent to the primary datacenter and, only in case of unavailability, be transparently sent to the secondary/backup datacenter     Solution: Use GSLB.me in priority balancing mode Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com… Read More

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Load balancing between two datacenters

Scenario: You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity) Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com) On the  first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t You need your clients traffic to be equally split between the two datacenters     Solution: Use GSLB.me in round robin balancing mode Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record Create two targets, one for each datacenter Assign the relevant checks to each target Configure the CNAME record on the primary DNS server that… Read More

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Using aliases for datacenter dependencies

Scenario: You have at least two datacenters running the same application and both datacenters are simultaneously active (business continuity) Your application is mapped on a well-defined hostname (ie. www.myapplication.com) On the first datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP a.b.c.d. One the second datacenter www.myapplication.com is running on IP x.y.z.t You need to monitor your application health using IP addresses that are different from a.b.c.d and x.y.z.t     Solution: Use GSLB.me in round robin balancing mode Define one geohost that will be pointed by www.myapplication.com via a DNS CNAME record Create two targets, one for each datacenter and define their aliases. Targets will be healthcheck-monitored using their IP addresses but… Read More

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